Socio-economic conditions critical to PAs

Socio-economic conditions critical to PAs

An international study published in Nature Communications involving CEED researchers from the University of Queensland has found that protected areas (PAs) have been largely successful at safeguarding wildlife within their boundaries, particularly in wealthier, more developed countries. Lead author Megan Barnes said the socio-economic conditions of the country in which a park was located was […]

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Strategic framing for landholder engagement

A study of how private-land conservation organisations frame the benefits of participation has found a bias for emphasising the environmental benefits, while under-emphasising the benefits to landholders and the wider social benefits. “The success of these conservation efforts is tied to the engagement of landholders, however only a small proportion of landholders participate in conservation” […]

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Gums could be goners as climate changes

Australians could see suitable environments for the country’s iconic eucalypt trees in decline within a generation, according to new international research involving a CEED Researcher Nathalie Butt. The findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, paint a stark picture with the habitat of more than 90% of eucalypt species set to decline, with 16 […]

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Kerrie Wilson receives the Fenner Prize from PM

CEED’s Associate Professor Kerrie Wilson has been awarded one of Australia’s most prestigious science awards – the Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year (as part of the this year’s Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science). University of Queensland’s Vice-Chancellor Professor Peter Høj said Dr Wilson’s research built connections between ecosystems, governments and people. “Kerrie […]

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Don’t let ‘climate’ crush coral efforts

Following a recent international coral science conference, CEED researcher Jennifer McGowan led a short correspondence to Nature asking to researchers and managers not to lose sight of where they can make the most difference. “The message of the correspondence aims to unite the coral reef science and management communities after the International Coral Reef Symposium […]

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Riparian vegetation along Brisbane River. Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits.

Restoring waterways cost-effectively

Southeast Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits through drinking water supply, fishing, tourism, and recreation. But these goods and services are under threat from intensive agricultural, urban development and climate change.

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Ecological restoration is complex and expensive. Economists can provide multiple insights on how to make it more effective. (Photo courtesy of Greening Australia)

I’m an economist – I’m here to help

How economics can enhance the success of ecological restoration Key messages: Economic principles, tools and instruments can be applied to a range of factors that affect the success of a restoration project Addressing four key aspects of ecological restoration would enhance their success: (1) assessing social/economic benefits, (2) estimating overall costs, (3) effective prioritisation, and […]

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Following the genetic rescue, Mt Buller mountain pygmy possums are now bigger, fitter and more genetically diverse than before the translocation of males from Mt Hotham. (Photo by Andrew Weeks)

Evolutionary biology – what is it good for?

And can it guide conservation decisions? Key messages: Evolutionary processes will be critical to biodiversity conservation in a time of global environmental change New advances in molecular biology make it faster and cheaper to do genetic analysis Environmental decision making needs to better integrate with evolutionary biology to create enduring solutions Ongoing evolution will be critical for the […]

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