Australian cities critical for threatened wildlife

Australian cities critical for threatened wildlife

Australian cities can help conserve the country’s endangered animals and plants say CEED scientists. New research reveals that Australian cities still retain a remarkable number of threatened species. All Australian cities and towns contain species that are officially listed as threatened. Sydney has the most, at 126 species, Kalgoorlie-Boulder in Western Australia has the most […]

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Migratory birds lack protection

CEED scientists have called for a greater international collaborative effort to save the world’s migratory birds, many of which are at risk of extinction due to loss of habitat along their flight paths. More than 90% of the world’s migratory birds are inadequately protected due to poorly coordinated conservation around the world. The research found […]

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Major shortfalls in marine conservation

A new study says that more than 17,000 marine species worldwide remain largely unprotected. The authors (including several CEED researchers) looked at the ranges of some 17,348 species of marine life, including whales, sharks rays and fish, and found that 97.4% have less than 10% of their range represented in marine protected areas. http://ceed.edu.au/ceed-news/ceed-media-releases/322- major-shortfalls-identified-in-marine-conservation.html

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CEED’s big bash

Every two years the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions brings its people together in one place to share new ideas, reflect on what’s been happening and plan for the future. In December, CEED’s 2015 conference was held in Canberra at the Australian National University. As always it generated a wealth of ideas, catalysed […]

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About CEED

What is CEED? Go to our website and you’ll read it’s a ‘partnership’ and a ‘world-leading research centre’ (for solving environmental management problems and for evaluating the outcomes of environmental actions). Of course, that’s true but it says little about the people that make up CEED. At its heart, CEED is a network of people […]

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Making more of the concept of ecosystem services

How ecosystem services can better inform environmental decisions Key messages ecosystem services is a timely and relevant concept in the science policy interface most research on ecosystem services does not cover all elements of the decision-making process future assessments need to better articulate objectives, identify performance measures and consider the alternative actions Ecosystem services are […]

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Fragmentation and ecosystem services

Connecting a fragmented landscape with human wellbeing Key messages natural landscapes are being fragmented in Australia and around the world not only does this impact biodiversity, it also disrupts the provision of ecosystem services we propose a new framework that examines the supply, demand and flow of ecosystem services as a means of assessing the […]

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Focussing on the fox alone might unleash the rabbit population creating an even bigger impact on the threatened species being managed for.

Threat management and conservation priorities

Accounting for the interactions between management actions Key messages threatened species face multiple threats that need managing effective management requires a consideration of how management actions for different threats might act together considering management interactions when choosing conservation priorities is not common Threatened plants and animals often face multiple threats, each of which require different […]

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Which birds are ‘woodland birds’? It depends on who
you ask. These are black-faced woodswallows, classified as a woodland bird in 37.5% of lists. (Photo by Eric  Vanderuys)

What’s in a name?

The consequences of inconsistently classifying woodland birds (and other terms) Key messages woodland birds are inconsistently classified this inconsistency has a significant impact on research involving woodland birds inconsistencies in other areas of conservation science are likely having similar impact Woodland birds are bird species which depend on native woodlands. They are sometimes called woodland-dependent […]

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Clearing of mulga in central Australia. Conservation activities in heavily cleared landscapes focus on keeping the remaining large patches intact, often disregarding the increasingly important role of smaller patches in conserving biodiversity. (Photo by Michelle Venter)

Small patches need greater protection

Small patches of native vegetation are critically important to biodiversity conservation and need greater protection from clearing according to a new analysis undertaken by Ayesha Tulloch and colleagues. Just because a patch of native vegetation might be small, doesn’t mean we can afford to lose it. The researchers examined historical and current patch-size distributions to […]

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On threat and service

Two themes dominate many of the stories in this issue of Decision Point: managing conservation threats and accounting for ecosystem services. While these are quite different topics, underlying both of them in this set of articles is a plea to look at the bigger picture. What is the context of the threat or the ecosystem […]

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