What happens to wildlife when farmland becomes a plantation?

What happens to wildlife when farmland becomes a plantation?

What happens to the wildlife in patches of native vegetation when the surrounding agricultural landscape is converted from open grazed land to closed pine plantation forest? This is far from being an academic question as this situation is increasingly common as plantations are often established on cultivated or grazed land. Alessio Mortelliti and colleagues conducted […]

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Can growling grass frogs cope with chytrid?

New research from Geoff Heard and colleagues demonstrates that the impact of chytridiomycosis (a disease caused by amphibian chytrid fungus) on populations of growling grass frogs (Litoria raniformis, an endangered species) is mediated by wetland microclimate and water chemistry. Prevalence of the disease is considerably lower in warm and saline wetlands. It’s known from previous […]

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Climate-induced resource bottlenecks and species vulnerability

Resource bottlenecks – periods of severe restriction in resource availability – can be triggered by increased climate variability. This is believed to represent an important mechanism through which climate change will affect biodiversity and yet little is understood about its potential impact. Martine Maron and colleagues recently reviewed the topic. They synthesized the key global […]

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Ten year science plan for ‘blue’ economy

The National Marine Science Plan is a consensus document from over 23 marine research organisations, universities and government departments and more than 500 scientists. It provides a set of recommendations for science that will be at the heart of dealing with the challenges of our marine nation. According to the ‘Plan’, Australia’s marine industries will […]

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Sugeng Budiharta (on the left) counting
epiphytic orchids in Indonesian forests.

A good ‘fellow’ for tropical rainforests

Sugeng Budiharta is passionate about conserving biodiversity and restoring tropical forest, and in particular the forests of Indonesia, his country of origin. That’s why he chose to undertake a PhD at the University of Queensland and work with CEED in trying to understand the trade-offs between different types of forest restoration. It’s often said that […]

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Workshoppers discuss the finer points of causal inference at the CEED
workshop at the University of Queensland in July.
(Photo by Jane Campbell)

Causal inference in conservation

A CEED Workshop, University of Queensland, July 2015 How can we be confident that a conservation intervention had a positive impact? This was the central question at a recent workshop at the University of Queensland on causal inference. We’ve all heard the adage that ‘correlation does not imply causation’ – so we wanted to find […]

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IPBES chooses Young Fellows from CEED

ECRs to contribute to an international effort to save the planet’s biodiversity Vanessa Adams and Sugeng Budiharta are two early-career conservation scientists based at the University of Queensland working with CEED. Their science will soon be informing international efforts to save biodiversity as they have just been selected as Young Fellows of IPBES. IPBES stands […]

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The species in question

The work of the Environmental Decision Group is about better conservation outcomes. Sometimes, however, when the talk is all about evaluation, adaptive management, spatial optimisation and project prioritisation, it’s possible to lose to sight of the purpose of the science – protecting, enhancing and restoring nature, ecosystems and species. It’s kind of the reverse of […]

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