Assessing multiple threats to threatened species

Assessing multiple threats to threatened species

Many species of conservation concern are in decline due to threats from multiple sources. To quantify the conservation requirements of these species we need robust estimates of the impact of each threat on the rate of population decline. However, for the vast majority of species this information is lacking. Here researchers demonstrate the application of integrated population modelling as a […]

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Improving biodiversity monitoring

Effective biodiversity monitoring is critical to effective conservation practice. Well conceived, designed and implemented monitoring of biodiversity should: (i) deliver information on trends; (ii) provide early warning of problems that might otherwise be difficult or expensive to reverse; (iii) generate quantifiable evidence of conservation successes and failures; (iv) highlight ways to make management more effective; and (v) provide information […]

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Accounting for variability when designing wildlife surveys

Occupancy-based monitoring programs rely on survey data to infer presence or absence of the target species. However, species may occupy a site and go undetected, leading to the erroneous inference of absence (‘false absence’). If detectability is influenced by the time of year or weather conditions, survey protocols can be adjusted to minimise the chance of false absences. In this […]

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Posing problems in the Park

NERP Workshop (Melbourne, May 2012) Supercolonies of yellow crazy ants are threatening the forest ecosystems on Christmas Island. Can we predict where supercolonies are likely to form? Will these predictions lead to better targeted control effort? The noxious bitou bush has invaded coastal ecosystems in Booderee National Park in Jervis Bay, NSW, and park managers are pouring significant resources into […]

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Making decisions on migrating species

CEED/NERP Workshop (Brisbane, May 2012) Migratory species throw up a number of unique challenges for conservation managers because of their complex life histories. Current tools and legislation often fail to take their special circumstances into account. To try and address this gap, Richard Fuller and I recently ran a workshop jointly funded by CEED and NERP. The workshop brought […]

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IPBES: a platform for intergovernmental action on biodiversity

A global gloom-and-doom report, or an opportunity to make a real difference? Panama, April 2012 – a new intergovernmental platform is born, and this one aims to make a real difference to the plight of our declining biodiversity. The baby in this case is called IPBES, and while its coming has been much hyped in some circles, to […]

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Mapping koala habitat quality

Tools to help save an Australian icon Loved the world over, the koala is an icon of Australia’s natural and cultural heritage. Unfortunately, its iconic status hasn’t protected it from numerous threats including habitat loss and fragmentation, predation, vehicle collision, disease, and changing drought and fire regimes (Decision Point #50, p6). The koala’s continued survival in many parts of Australia […]

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Of experts and public preferences

Are they seeing eye to eye when it comes to conservation? There is an increasing reliance on experts and expert judgement in decision making in regards to conservation (see ‘So you think you’re an expert’ in DPoint #58). That’s to be expected given the complexity of many conservation issues, the frequent demand for quick decisions and the very limited […]

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Should we try to save parasites too?

Extinction of dependent species during translocation of threatened hosts Recently we posed the question: “When we move a threatened plant species to a new site to improve its chances of survival, should we make a similar effort at moving the insects that live on that plant?” (see Decision Point #53). We recommended that conservation programs for threatened plants – […]

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