Calling all readers!

Calling all readers!

Decision Point is now on the endangered list As most of our readers know, in any conservation equation there are trade-offs and critical decision points. And Decision Point itself is now at this stage. Funding for Decision Point ends in 2018. What would YOU like to see happen to Decision Point? Please let us know […]

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CEED CI Iadine Chadès takes part in the final group discussion at the Boden Conference)

Surprise, collapse, hope and the seeds of renewal

The 2018 Boden Conference:  Ecological Surprises and Rapid Collapse of Ecosystems in a Changing World In recent years the world has witnessed the ‘collapse’ of a range of ecosystems including the mass bleaching of coral reefs, the sudden disappearance of giant kelp forests and the withering of subantarctic alpine tundra (to name a few systems […]

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Decision scientist and policy person out in the field. Researchers want their research to inform policy and management but it often doesn’t happen. For greater interaction, scientists need to acknowledge the many cultural differences between the the world of research and policy formation.

Decision science and environmental policy

Achieving better outcomes from environmental policy is more than just good science Key messages: Decision science is only one of many factors that may be relevant in the environmental-policy process. Decision science has enormous potential to make policies more effective at delivering outcomes that are highly valued by the community. There are a number of […]

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2. DPoint #105 high res pdf (for stories)_Page_10_Image_0001

Tweet tweet

Celebrating CEED’s Inaugural Twitter conference On 22 May 2018, CEED ran its inaugural Twitter Conference on Environmental Decisions and it was a huge success! With over 200 participants and a potential reach of almost 600,000 people, #CEEDTC2018 trended at number 1 on Twitter in Australia. The conference reached all over the world but our online […]

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A Bornean orangutan. A central pillar of the RSPO is to manage palm-oil plantations in a way that maintains and/or enhances highconservation-value species such as orangutans (which are to be monitored and protected by palm-oil growers). It is expected that there would be no loss or a reduced rate of loss of orangutan populations in RSPO-certified concessions (as compared with equivalent non-certified concessions). Unfortunately, our analysis showed no difference.  (Image by Marc Ancrenaz)

The Roundtable that brings little hope for orangutans

Sustainable certified palm oil scheme failing to achieve goals Key messages: Industrial palm-oil plantations in South East Asia have caused significant biodiversity losses and perverse social outcomes We compared plantations operated under the RSPO sustainability certification with equivalent uncertified plantations in Borneo No significant difference was found between certified and non-certified plantations for any of […]

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A red ironbark woodland in Jackass Flat Nature Conservation Reserve, Victoria. What’s the value of acquiring more information for our management of these ecosystems? (Photo by Melburnian, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Valuing information for management

Improving the future of box-ironbark forests with targeted learning Key messages: Value-of-information analysis reveals the expected benefit of reducing uncertainty to a decision maker. We performed this analysis on management of box-ironbark forests. With three management alternatives (limited harvest/ firewood removal, ecological thinning, and no management), managing the system optimally (for 150 years) with the […]

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Billions of dollars are being spent around the world on adapting our cities to climate change. Unfortunately, most of the planning to this point does not include the specific intention of making space for biodiversity. This is a lost opportunity for conservation and the resilience of our cities. There is now considerable evidence of the many values of bringing biodiversity into our urban spaces, as well as the creation of many strategies on how it might be achieved. Pictured above is one depiction of how biodiversity might be incorporated around the urban development at Fisherman’s Bend near Melbourne. It’s part of the work being done by researchers at RMIT under the theme of Biodiversity Sensitive Urban Design. See https://iconscience.org/biodiversity-sensitive-urban-design/ for details.

Injecting biodiversity into city spaces

Cities planning to adapt to climate change should take biodiversity along for the ride Key messages: Cities are investing billions of dollars in climate change adaptation We analysed 80 city climate-adaptation plans and found that urban greening plays a key role in most adaptation strategies. This represents an enormous opportunity for biodiversity conservation. Unfortunately, our […]

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CEED Alumni (and ECR) Kate Helmstedt leads the discussion at the Boden Conference on ecosystem collapse.

Conferencing with CEED

From little tweets to big cities How many metric tonnes of carbon are emitted in travelling to an international environmental conference (including all those airplane miles as delegates jet in from afar)? Five? Five hundred? How about zero? Well that was the carbon footprint of CEED’s inaugural Twitter Conference (#CEEDTC2018) which we ran on 22 May (and coincided with the […]

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Wildlife and the city

In April, I had the privilege of visiting a truly innovative nature sanctuary in Wellington called Zealandia. I was there to meet Dr Danielle Shanahan, a former CEED post doc who is now the sanctuary’s Manager of Conservation and Research. Visitors to Zealandia get the chance to wander its 225 hectares of native plantings and interact with a broad range of […]

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