James Allan wins Elsevier Atlas Award

James Allan wins Elsevier Atlas Award

CEED PhD student James Allan was recently awarded the Elsevier Atlas Award, as the lead author on a study examining climate change impacts on World Heritage Sites (Allan et al, 2017). The Atlas is awarded to a single journal article each month, from the thousands of articles published in Elsevier’s journals. James’ article revealed that […]

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Justine Shaw (left).

Justine Shaw on a roll

Wins national prize CEED researcher Dr Justine Shaw (pictured on the left) is on a roll. She has just had two articles published in the prestigious scientific journal, Nature. And she is part of a group named ‘Species on the move’ that won the national 2017 Peer Prize for Women. The first Nature article predicts […]

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Viv Tulloch presents at the IWC

Viv Tulloch recently completed her PhD with CEED working on several different threat-management problems in collaboration with the Wildlife Conservation Society, The Nature Conservancy, CSIRO, and the International Whaling Commission (IWC). At the most recent IWC Scientific Meeting in Slovenia, she presented findings from the multi-species model developed during her PhD. The model explores interactions […]

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Decision Point en Español #3

For the third year running the Spanish quarter of CEED has compiled and published a Spanish-language version of Decision Point (you can find the first two issues of Decision Point en Español at http://decision-point.com.au/past-issues/special-issues/#enEspanol). As with issues 1 and 2, the third issue contains a few stories from the English version of Decision Point (in […]

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The mass migration of red crabs on Christmas Island is one of the natural wonders of the world. But the red crab and many other species on this isolated island are under threat. Given limited resources, how do Christmas Island National Park managers choose between multiple actions to protect multiple species?  (Photo by Max Orchard, Parks Australia)

Choosing between options with limited resources

A simple Cost-Effective Resource Allocator Key messages: Decision scientists working with national park managers have developed a user-friendly Cost-Effective Resource Allocator The allocator prioritises the set of management strategies that maximise the total number of years that a suite of species is expected to persist given a constrained budget The allocator uses a series of […]

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The growling grass frog is one of Australia’s largest frog species. It likes to live amongst reeds, sedges and rushes growing in and along slow moving streams, ponds, lakes and farm dams. (Photo by Geoff Heard). 
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Urban development and the growling grass frog

Good decisions under high uncertainty Key messages: We linked a PVA with a CEA to determine which actions would best help the growling grass frog persist in a development zone Our approach allows uncertainty in species persistence to be explicitly accounted for in the CEA of different actions This analysis found that simply reserving core […]

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Virtual variety

Conference technologies in ecology and conservation While it makes eminent sense, there has been limited uptake of virtual conference technologies in ecology and conservation (with the notable exception of the World Seabird Twitter Conferences – see our article). In other fields, virtual conferencing is more common. The great thing about virtual conferencing is that the […]

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It is indisputable that animal-borne telemetry has enriched our understanding of the natural world and the animals that inhabit it. But could it also be providing a better guide to environmental decision making? (Images by Catherine Lynch)

Telemetry technology for better conservation

Integrating animal-borne technology with conservation management   Key messages: Research using animal telemetry devices can influence conservation decisions, and should be better integrated with management and policy Value-of-information analysis enables a quantitative assessment on the return-on-investment of animal telemetry-derived data for conservation decision-making Animal-borne telemetry has revolutionised our ability to study animal movement, species physiology, […]

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Billions of dollars have been invested in large-scale restoration programs across farming landscapes in Australia and overseas. Some projects involve the protection of remnant native vegetation, others involve linear or block plantings of native trees. Some involve innovative mixes of native and traditional crops. Which approaches work? Which designs are most cost effective and enduring? Longterm monitoring can generate the evidence on which to judge these programs and build better policy (evidence-based policy). Unfortunately, long-term monitoring for such programs is more the exception than the rule. (Image by Dean Ansell)

Five things about long-term monitoring

Good decisions for the environment need an eye on the longer term Key messages: Long-term monitoring provides essential evidence on which to base good environmental decisions Good design is essential for effective long-term monitoring Things change over time; to remain effective, long-term monitoring needs to adapt around these changes Partnerships are crucial for ensuring long-term […]

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The superb fairy-wren feeds on insects and small grubs, and will often appear in small groups in gardens with dense, low, native shrub cover. (Image by Geoff Park)

Grow your own

Wildlife gardening for public–private biodiversity conservation   Key messages: Five features help collaborative wildlife gardening programs engage residents to manage their land to achieve landscape-focused conservation goals: on-site garden assessment indigenous community nursery communication hubs a framework that fosters experiential learning and community linkages endorsement of each garden’s potential conservation contribution Involving communities in appreciating […]

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Prescribed burns for multiple objectives

Fire management for asset protection and the environment Reducing fuel around assets is considered a good hazard-reduction strategy, however, a more effective approach may be to burn for a mosaic throughout the ecosystem. This may reduce the overall fuel of the system, as well has have added benefits for the environment. Land managers and scientists […]

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DP#101 draft 5 July 2017_Page_06_Image_0002

Using range maps to plan protected areas

Trade-offs in the use of species distribution maps for protected area planning Key messages: Planning for new protected areas using range maps can lead to overestimating the level of protection, due to commission errors The adoption of a coarse analytical resolution can slightly mitigate this effect but leads to inefficient planning Intermediate resolutions are the […]

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A silvereye amidst the (lantana) thorns. (Photo by Jasmine Zeleny)

To weed or not to weed…

 Impacts of reveg and weed control on urban-sensitive birds Key messages: Birds with varying sensitivities to urban areas interact with habitat restoration differently Reveg provides the greatest benefit for urban-sensitive species, and weed control provides neutral or in some cases negative outcomes Weed control should be implemented in concert with replanting of native vegetation to […]

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Ethics, equity and a ‘good’ environmental decision

Ethics and environmental decision science When researchers hear the word ‘ethics’ they often groan. That’s because the term usually arises in connection to ethics committees; panels which university-based scientists need to go through to get permission to undertake research. They ‘groan’ because it’s another transaction cost on getting their research done. Having said that, every […]

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Decision Science 101

Earlier this year CEED’s Chief Investigators came together at O’Reilly’s Rainforest Retreat (Lamington National Park, Qld, CIs are pictured) to reflect on CEED’s impact on the world of environmental decision science and to plan a ‘book of lessons’ emerging out of our research. CEED didn’t invent decision science but, through its research and tool development, […]

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