Managing invasive birds wisely

A CEED workshop

(Canberra, June 2014)

The science and management of pest mammals has received substantial attention in Australia over the past decade. Much less work, however, has been done on invasive birds, which is unfortunate as alien invasive birds can have substantial and wide ranging impacts. Thanks to continuous data gathering by birders, there is information on their spatial and temporal patterns of establishment. In this workshop, we attempted to bring together experts from a range of organizations across Australia to advance our understanding of invasive birds management and to develop collaborations.

Workshop participants brought with them expertise on avian conservation, ecology, invasion biology, environmental decision making and behavior, and perspectives from a range of academic, governmental and non-governmental organisations. These included the University of Queensland, ANU, University of Newcastle, University of Canberra, University of Adelaide, University of Tasmania, Rutgers University (USA), Biosecurity SA, NSW Department of Primary Industries/Orange Agricultural Institute NSW, Invasive Animals CRC, Australian Museum (Sydney), BirdLife Tasmania and the Canberra Indian Myna Action Group.

Participants of the invasive birds workshop earlier this year.

Participants of the invasive birds workshop earlier this year.

In the workshop, which took place at the Mt Stromlo Observatory, participants updated each other on their current and past work in the area; and discussed a range of new research directions including: the importance of among-species interactions in the avian invasion process, impacts and the efficiency of control measures, and the role of social media in invasion research. One of the important issues that came up was the lack of robust information on the motivations for and outcomes of control efforts.

A small follow up CEED/NERP workshop focusing on bird invasions on islands took place during July 2014 in Queensland.

More info: Salit Kark s.kark@uq.edu.au

Research by the Kark Group in Queensland and NSW (funded by the ARC ) into native cavity nesting bird species and their interactions with invasive pest species.

Research by the Kark Group in Queensland and NSW (funded by the ARC ) into native cavity nesting bird species and their interactions with invasive pest species.

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