Down for the count

Carnaby’s cockatoos feed on the seeds of a variety of native and introduced plant species and on insect larvae. Plants include kwongan heath plants such as banksias, dryandra, hakea, grevillea and also marri seeds. New research suggests fire management may make an important contribution to sustaining the cockatoo’s food sources. (Photo by Leonie Valentine)

Carnaby’s cockatoos feed on the seeds of a variety of native and introduced plant species and on insect larvae. Plants include kwongan heath plants such as banksias, dryandra, hakea, grevillea and also marri seeds. New research suggests fire management may make an important contribution to sustaining the cockatoo’s food sources.
(Photo by Leonie Valentine)

“The iconic Carnaby’s black cockatoo may die out in the Perth region within 15 years, a report has found, prompting calls for the state and federal governments to protect remaining habitats. The 2014 Great Cocky Count report by Birdlife Australia and Western Australia’s Department of Parks and Wildlife estimated the current rate of decline in the cockatoos’ population on the Perth-Peel coastal plain was 15% per year. The minimum count for the birds in the region was 7154, with 59% of those found around the Gnangara Pine Plantation, north of Perth. The figure represents up to 10% of the entire population of the species, which is endemic to Western Australia’s South West. Birdlife Australia said the cockatoos had adapted to the pine plantations in the 1950s to survive the loss of 1,000 hectares of native bush around Perth each year.”

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-08-25/carnabys-blackcockatoos-threatened-with-extinction-in-perth/5695710

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