Carbon farming and biodiversity

Under the Carbon Farming Futures program, rural landholders have the potential to generate carbon credits through activities such as agro-forestry, re-vegetation of land or changed agricultural practices. Each of these activities may have positive or negative effects beyond their intended mitigation of climate change (externalities or co-benefits). There are many, and often complex, costs and co-benefits that should be taken into account when assessing different carbon farming mitigation options.

This workshop, ran at The University of Western Australia in November 2013, brought together various players working on this issue from around Australia. We aimed to create valuable collaborations and produce useful research outputs. The workshop drew together ecologists, economists, social scientists, modellers, foresters, policy officers and carbon consultants; all sharing their insights on how farming for carbon and farming for biodiversity can be understood, measured and traded off.

Lessons shared on mixing carbon with biodiversity planting.

Lessons shared on mixing carbon with biodiversity planting.

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