Grow your own

The superb fairy-wren feeds on insects and small grubs, and will often appear in small groups in gardens with dense, low, native shrub cover. (Image by Geoff Park)

Grow your own

Wildlife gardening for public–private biodiversity conservation   Key messages: Five features help collaborative wildlife gardening programs engage residents to manage their land to achieve landscape-focused conservation goals: on-site garden assessment indigenous community nursery communication hubs a framework that fosters experiential learning and community linkages endorsement of each garden’s potential conservation contribution Involving communities in appreciating […]

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A silvereye amidst the (lantana) thorns. (Photo by Jasmine Zeleny)

To weed or not to weed…

 Impacts of reveg and weed control on urban-sensitive birds Key messages: Birds with varying sensitivities to urban areas interact with habitat restoration differently Reveg provides the greatest benefit for urban-sensitive species, and weed control provides neutral or in some cases negative outcomes Weed control should be implemented in concert with replanting of native vegetation to […]

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Using fire to promote wildlife conservation

Understanding how pyrodiversity begets biodiversity Key messages: Pyrodiversity describes the variation in the time between fires, their severity, size and patchiness New work is advancing our knowledge of the connection between pyrodiversity and biodiversity but there is a need to further develop approaches that are better tailored to local conditions All around the world fire […]

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Eucalypt regen in central Victoria

The processes of eucalypt recruitment are infrequent, patchy and difficult to predict. Long timeframes with appropriate incentives are needed to manage natural regeneration. These are the conclusions of Peter Vesk and colleagues who sought to investigate the processes of eucalypt regeneration within the Bush Returns trial, a native vegetation management incentive scheme in the Goulburn […]

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Photo of riparian planting

Stream-side plantings and ecosystem services

What do dairy farmers think about planting riparian margins? Key messages: We surveyed Taranaki dairy farmers on their perceptions of the value of riparian plantings They reported many different values with the plantings; some positive, some negative Farmers who carried out riparian plantings reported improvement to both farm performance and the environment Over two stormy […]

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Clearing of mulga in central Australia. Conservation activities in heavily cleared landscapes focus on keeping the remaining large patches intact, often disregarding the increasingly important role of smaller patches in conserving biodiversity. (Photo by Michelle Venter)

Small patches need greater protection

Small patches of native vegetation are critically important to biodiversity conservation and need greater protection from clearing according to a new analysis undertaken by Ayesha Tulloch and colleagues. Just because a patch of native vegetation might be small, doesn’t mean we can afford to lose it. The researchers examined historical and current patch-size distributions to […]

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What happens to wildlife when farmland becomes a plantation?

What happens to the wildlife in patches of native vegetation when the surrounding agricultural landscape is converted from open grazed land to closed pine plantation forest? This is far from being an academic question as this situation is increasingly common as plantations are often established on cultivated or grazed land. Alessio Mortelliti and colleagues conducted […]

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Private benefits of native veg on private land 

In many parts of the world, natural vegetation has been cleared to allow agricultural production. To ensure a long-term flow of ecosystem services without compromising agricultural activities, restoring the environment requires a balance between public and private benefits and costs. Information about private benefits generated by environmental assets can be utilized to identify conservation opportunities […]

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What’s the point?

How much native habitat is enough? The question for farm and landscape planning is: ‘How much intensive production can take place without excluding most native species from the landscape?’ Roughly speaking, if any land use that largely excludes native biodiversity (eg, crops, plantations, fertilised pastures) covers less than one-third of the landscape, it is unlikely […]

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