Restoring waterways cost-effectively

Riparian vegetation along Brisbane River. Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits.

Restoring waterways cost-effectively

Southeast Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits through drinking water supply, fishing, tourism, and recreation. But these goods and services are under threat from intensive agricultural, urban development and climate change.

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Australian cities critical for threatened wildlife

Australian cities can help conserve the country’s endangered animals and plants say CEED scientists. New research reveals that Australian cities still retain a remarkable number of threatened species. All Australian cities and towns contain species that are officially listed as threatened. Sydney has the most, at 126 species, Kalgoorlie-Boulder in Western Australia has the most […]

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Big trees for urban wildlife

Australian cities must work harder to preserve their large, old trees if we want to keep our native animals. Across Australia – and the world – the future of large old trees is bleak and yet large trees support many species such as birds and small mammals says CEED researcher Darren Le Roux. “Studies based […]

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Stay up in the tree koala, there’s a dog just below you!! Resident koala
in study area (peri-urban), on a property with a free roaming dog.
(Photo by Nicole Shumway)

A mismatch between attitudes and actions

Knowing there is a problem and doing something about it can sometimes be entirely different things. Koalas, while much beloved by the Australian public, have been in steady decline for at least the last decade. A combination of threats like habitat loss and modification, car collisions and dog attacks, led to the koala being listed under the EPBC Act in 2012. Increasingly, more councils (and Local Government Areas) are drafting and implementing local koala management plans and developing strategies to combat losses and aid in population recovery. However, in order for these conservation goals to be effective, members of the general public must be willing to adopt the suggested actions and incorporate them into their everyday routine. How feasible is this when such a large gap exists between peoples’ intent to conserve and their actual conservation behavior? What might influence those decisions?

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