‘Planning’ for climate change

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Making more of the concept of ecosystem services

How ecosystem services can better inform environmental decisions Key messages ecosystem services is a timely and relevant concept in the science policy interface most research on ecosystem services does not cover all elements of the decision-making process future assessments need to better articulate objectives, identify performance measures and consider the alternative actions Ecosystem services are […]

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Prioritising species for monitoring conservation actions

Evaluating the success of a conservation strategy is a crucial element of best practice management. Without it, managers can’t benefit from the experiences of others and scarce funds available could be wasted. And, if the strategy isn’t actually working, a lack of evaluation could lead to misguided policy directives and a loss of confidence of donors.

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Gondwana Link and decision theory

Reflecting on the fruits of collaborative research Four years ago we embarked on a collaborative research project that aimed to explore how environmental decision making and spatial prioritisation might contribute to improving the conservation outcomes of Gondwana Link, one of Australia’s largest and most ambitious conservation projects (see the box on research partners or see […]

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Threatened ecosystems, like seagrasses, face multiple threats. Managers have some capacity to address these threats where they occur locally to the ecosystem. That might be in the marine environment surrounding the seagrass beds or on land adjacent to the ecosystem. But managers have limited capacity to address global stressors such as climate change. That doesn’t mean they can ignore impacts from climate change. What’s important is how local stressors interact with global stressors. (Photo by Megan Saunders).

Some things I can do, some things I can’t

I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.” It’s a great piece of advice for any conservation manager struggling to deal with multiple threats with inadequate resources. However, in an age when our most important (and much loved) ecosystems are under growing pressure, we’d like to suggest that true wisdom lies not only in knowing the difference between the things we can and can’t change, but also understanding how these things interact.

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