Modelling Kalimantan’s tropical forest landscapes

Photo of the Ex-Mega Rice Project Area

Modelling Kalimantan’s tropical forest landscapes

Mixed policies can meet multiple expectations Key messages: We analysed the potential outcomes of 10 alternative land-use policy scenarios for a high-priority region for forest protection, restoration and rural development in Central Kalimantan All 10 policy strategies are capable of achieving all stakeholder objectives provided at least 29–37% of the landscape is conserved for biodiversity […]

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Floodwaters rising

Relating flooding to land-use in Indonesian Borneo Key messages: Flood events are widespread in Indonesian Borneo, and have large impacts on communities Two novel sources of information – village interviews and news archives – give new insights into where and when floods occur, and how they relate to the surrounding landscape Floods have large impacts […]

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A peat swamp forest in Kalimantan.
(Photo by Ruanda Agung Sugardiman)

For peat’s sake

The peat swamp forest in the south of Kalimantan is an unusual ecosystem that is home to many unique or rare species such as orangutans. It consists of diverse range of tropical trees standing on a layer of peat up to10-12m deep. The peat is partly decayed and waterlogged plant material, and it in turn […]

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Farmers at work in an Indonesian rice field. The Mega Rice Project
aimed to help grow the economy, create employment and alleviate
poverty for men and women. Unfortunately, the many other values of
the peat swamp it replaced were discounted. (Photo by Josh Estey.)

Balancing trade-offs between land-use policy objectives

Exploring options in an abandoned agricultural project in Kalimantan Conservation and economic paradigms are shifting. In decades past it seemed fine to dedicate land to either conservation or production. But more recently we realise that this is inadequate to save all biodiversity, particularly where we want and need it. We live in a world of […]

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An adult male orangutan in a Kalimantan oil-palm plantation, now an
endangered species. (Photo by Nardiyono)

Prioritising restoration in Kalimantan

Mention Indonesia and images of soaring rainforests and orangutans come to mind. But the reality is quite different. Over 63% of Indonesia’s forest estate is currently deforested or degraded (that’s around 83 million hectares), and many of its iconic species such as the orangutan and proboscis monkeys are endangered. And the deforestation marches on. In 2012 Indonesia broke the record for clearing tropical forest. The choking haze from burning forest and peatland has blanketed South East Asia many times in recent years, and awareness of the economic and health hazards associated with this is growing.

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