Achieving the targets of global conventions

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Achieving the targets of global conventions

A special issue of Conservation Letters In December 2016, Conservation Letters released its first special issue with the theme of ‘Achieving the targets of global biodiversity conventions’. The issue was spearheaded by members of CEED and the Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science (CBCS), specifically Moreno Di Marco, James Watson, Oscar Venter, and Hugh Possingham […]

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Photo of riparian planting

Stream-side plantings and ecosystem services

What do dairy farmers think about planting riparian margins? Key messages: We surveyed Taranaki dairy farmers on their perceptions of the value of riparian plantings They reported many different values with the plantings; some positive, some negative Farmers who carried out riparian plantings reported improvement to both farm performance and the environment Over two stormy […]

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Floodwaters rising

Relating flooding to land-use in Indonesian Borneo Key messages: Flood events are widespread in Indonesian Borneo, and have large impacts on communities Two novel sources of information – village interviews and news archives – give new insights into where and when floods occur, and how they relate to the surrounding landscape Floods have large impacts […]

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Ecosystem services: an idea with enormous value

And CEED is active in realising that potential The idea of ecosystem services emphasizes the benefits that nature provides – benefits that are both tangible and intangible. This, among other things, includes the production of food and clean water, the regulation of floods, the provision of recreation and scenic beauty, a connection to place, and […]

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A brief history of ecosystem services

When did the notion of ‘ecosystem services’ take on real meaning? In one sense, it stretches back to the beginning of history with Plato noting the connection between deforestation, soil erosion and the drying of springs. However, attempting to frame the benefits of nature in a way that enabled us to make decisions around the […]

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Ecological restoration is complex and expensive. Economists can provide multiple insights on how to make it more effective. (Photo courtesy of Greening Australia)

I’m an economist – I’m here to help

How economics can enhance the success of ecological restoration Key messages: Economic principles, tools and instruments can be applied to a range of factors that affect the success of a restoration project Addressing four key aspects of ecological restoration would enhance their success: (1) assessing social/economic benefits, (2) estimating overall costs, (3) effective prioritisation, and […]

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Making more of the concept of ecosystem services

How ecosystem services can better inform environmental decisions Key messages ecosystem services is a timely and relevant concept in the science policy interface most research on ecosystem services does not cover all elements of the decision-making process future assessments need to better articulate objectives, identify performance measures and consider the alternative actions Ecosystem services are […]

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Fragmentation and ecosystem services

Connecting a fragmented landscape with human wellbeing Key messages natural landscapes are being fragmented in Australia and around the world not only does this impact biodiversity, it also disrupts the provision of ecosystem services we propose a new framework that examines the supply, demand and flow of ecosystem services as a means of assessing the […]

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