Strategic framing for landholder engagement

Strategic framing for landholder engagement

A study of how private-land conservation organisations frame the benefits of participation has found a bias for emphasising the environmental benefits, while under-emphasising the benefits to landholders and the wider social benefits. “The success of these conservation efforts is tied to the engagement of landholders, however only a small proportion of landholders participate in conservation” […]

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Don’t let ‘climate’ crush coral efforts

Following a recent international coral science conference, CEED researcher Jennifer McGowan led a short correspondence to Nature asking to researchers and managers not to lose sight of where they can make the most difference. “The message of the correspondence aims to unite the coral reef science and management communities after the International Coral Reef Symposium […]

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Conservation in a time of offshore oil and gas development

What are the challenges and opportunities? KEY MESSAGES: Offshore oil and gas development brings with it a range of challenges and opportunities for marine biodiversity conservation The conservation community should become more actively involved in the earliest planning and exploration phases of oil and gas extraction Environmental decision-support tools can be used to explicitly incorporate […]

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Should we protect highly threatened habitats or safe habitats?

Risk it or play it safe? KEY MESSAGES: There is a bias towards placing MPAs in areas that are least threatened We found that conservation targets in our study area could not be met solely by avoiding high threat areas A threat selection strategy should be part of the management toolbox Cost-effectiveness in spatial conservation […]

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Public servants from CEPA consider different networks of marine protected areas. (Image by Carissa Klein)

A National Marine Conservation Assessment for PNG

The marine environment of Papua New Guinea (PNG) is vast and diverse. Marine ecosystems directly support the livelihoods of Papua New Guineans through fisheries and development activities, and tourism. They provide an ecological foundation for much of the national economy and prosperity. However, the country’s marine environment is under threat from a growing population dependent […]

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Robecca Jumin from WWF-Malaysia (third from the right) receives a
certificate in conservation planning from trainers from the University
of Queensland (during one of the Marxan courses run in Malaysia).
From the right are Hugh Possingham, Hedley Grantham and Carissa
Klein. The course was run in 2010 in Sabah.

From Marxan to management

Ocean zoning with stakeholders establishes the Tun Mustapha Marine Park Malaysia has just established the Tun Mustapha Marine Park off the northern tip of Sabah province in Borneo (Malaysia). At 1.6 million hectares, it’s the country’s biggest marine protected area, and Marxan and CEED scientists have played an important role in the planning process that […]

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How good is our global network of marine reserves?

Major shortfalls identified in marine conservation KEY MESSAGES: This analysis provides a baseline for measuring how well our marine species are represented in protected areas Currently, most marine species are not well represented within marine protected areas It is imperative that new reserves are located in places that help better represent the full range of […]

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Conservation planning in a very complex region

The 3rd International Workshop in Advancing Conservation Planning in the Mediterranean Sea Back in 2012, a group of conservation researchers led by CEED scientists established a series of workshops that aimed to bring together scientists and managers working on conservation planning in the Mediterranean Sea (one of most human-impacted and jurisdictionally complex seas in the […]

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Example of fine-scale vegetation fragmentation (individual trees
fragmented by urban development, NSW). (Image http://www.wagga.
nsw.gov.au/city-of-wagga-wagga/recreation/lake-albert)

How often, how far, how risky and how biased?

Movement behaviour mediates the impacts of habitat fragmentation at multiple scales KEY MESSAGES Different scales of fragmentation have lethal consequences for animals with certain movement traits For at-risk species, the impact of fine-scale fragmentation was accentuated when fragmentation also occurred at the coarse scale The land use to target with conservation actions to reduce fragmentation […]

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Managed bees as vectors - an emerging topic for 2016.

Scanning the horizon for threats and opportunities

For the past eight years or so, a group of people from around the world have been convening in Madingley Hall at Cambridge University to consider what the future might look like for global conservation. The 20 or so participants include professional horizon scanners, a journalist, and experts from a wide range of disciplines relevant to conservation science (such as ecology, biosecurity, public health, social science and technology studies).

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Focussing on the fox alone might unleash the rabbit population creating an even bigger impact on the threatened species being managed for.

Threat management and conservation priorities

Accounting for the interactions between management actions Key messages threatened species face multiple threats that need managing effective management requires a consideration of how management actions for different threats might act together considering management interactions when choosing conservation priorities is not common Threatened plants and animals often face multiple threats, each of which require different […]

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Stakeholders discuss revegetation on the Greening Australia property Peniup, one of the project sites in the Fitz-Stirling section of Gondwana Link.

Mapping the social network

Achieving cross-scale collaboration for large scale conservation initiatives When it comes to addressing conservation and natural resource management problems it seems like ‘collaboration’ is a prerequisite for success. This is especially true for large-scale problems where multiple actors are involved, multiple objectives are on the table, multiple plans need to be negotiated and multiple solutions […]

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Of practitioners, participants & conservation tenders

Extensive clearing of native vegetation on rural properties throughout Australia over the last century has contributed to significant declines in biodiversity. In an effort to counter this, Australian governments have offered a range of voluntary payments to land owners to undertake conservation actions on their land (eg, planting native trees or protecting remnant native vegetation). In recent years these payments have frequently been offered as conservation tenders. Within these, landholder participants submit a bid to the implementing agency specifying the monetary compensation they require to perform a given set of management activities.

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