Making the most of carbon farming

Establishing native trees on agricultural land can yield both carbon and biodiversity benefits. CSIRO
and CEED researchers have examined what policy settings will deliver the greatest returns in both.
(Photo by David Salt)

Making the most of carbon farming

Carbon AND biodiversity benefits on agricultural land Key messages: Researchers evaluated policy mechanisms for supplying carbon and biodiversity co-benefits on Australian agricultural land Uniform payments targeting carbon achieved significant carbon sequestration but negligible biodiversity co-benefits. Land-use regulation increased biodiversity co-benefits, but was inefficient in regards to carbon Discriminatory payments with land-use competition were efficient and, […]

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Volunteers at the Organ Pipes National Park (just outside of Melbourne) help collect bats from bat boxes. The boxes, attached to the tree trunk, are around 6m off the ground. (Image by Claire Keely)

Are people willing to pay for carbon farming?

Public ‘willingness-to-pay’ for co-benefits Key messages: Adopting carbon farming practices often leads to a loss in profit for farmers We estimated the public’s ‘willingness-to-pay’ for the co-benefits of carbon farming Respondents were willing to pay $19.20 per year for every extra hectare of native vegetation, and $1.13 per year for every metric tonne of CO2-e […]

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Biodiverse carbon plantings in an agricultural landscape in Victoria. (Photo by Nooshin Torabi)

The money or the trees

What drives landholders’ participation in biodiverse carbon plantings? Key messages: We developed a Bayesian Belief Network that predicts landholder participation rate for any type of carbon-farming scheme We found that program characteristics are more influential at driving participation than financial incentives Biodiversity co-benefits of carbon planting is another important factor Many believe that biodiverse carbon […]

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Trade-offs between carbon farming and biodiversity

Under the Carbon Farming Futures Programme, rural landholders have the potential to generate carbon credits through activities such as agro-forestry, re-vegetation of land or changed agricultural practices. Each of these activities may have positive or negative effects beyond their intended mitigation of climate change (externalities or co-benefits).

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