Restoring waterways cost-effectively

Riparian vegetation along Brisbane River. Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits.

Restoring waterways cost-effectively

Southeast Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits through drinking water supply, fishing, tourism, and recreation. But these goods and services are under threat from intensive agricultural, urban development and climate change.

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Conservation in a time of offshore oil and gas development

What are the challenges and opportunities? KEY MESSAGES: Offshore oil and gas development brings with it a range of challenges and opportunities for marine biodiversity conservation The conservation community should become more actively involved in the earliest planning and exploration phases of oil and gas extraction Environmental decision-support tools can be used to explicitly incorporate […]

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Protecting Malaysian reef fish while minimising the impact on
Malaysian fisheries: which design tools get the balance right?
(Images by Carissa Klein)

What tools should we use to design marine reserves?

Accounting for the movement of fish and boats KEY MESSAGES: Balancing the needs of conservation with its impacts on fisheries is important when designing marine reserve networks Commonly used design tools based on static models are good at placing reserves to avoid short-term losses to fisheries Static models perform poorly for designing reserves that bring benefits to fisheries […]

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CEED leads international effort to make more of scenarios

CEED recently joined forces with CSIRO and the Belmont Forum project ‘ScenNet’ to explore ways that scenarios and models could be better used in setting and implementing conservation policy at national to global scales. (ScenNet is a global collaboration of researchers working on scenarios and models to support conservation assessment and decisions.) Developing environmental policy […]

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The orange-bellied parrot is endemic to Australia and critically
endangered. Eighteen IBAs have been identified in Australia for the
presence of this species. (Photo: © Jeremy Ringma.)

Reconciling ‘irreplaceability’ and ‘importance’

The expansion of the world’s protected area network is often held up as a measure of global progress towards effective biodiversity conservation. However, having more protected areas does not necessarily mean better biodiversity outcomes. In the past, two main approaches have been used to identify priority sites for biodiversity conservation: one based on thresholds, the other on complementarity. We recently combined both approaches to guide conservation planning.

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Life at Large: taking the big picture

Four years ago, the NERP Landscapes and Policy Hub (a sister hub to NERP Environmental Decisions) set out to answer the question ‘How do we take a regional-scale view of biodiversity?’ The trigger for this question was the Hawke review of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999). One of the questions facing the review was why, after 10 years of the Act being in operation, had the list of threatened and endangered species grown steadily to over 1,750 with precious few coming off that list. One of the review’s recommendations was to consider biodiversity at the scale of landscapes and whole regions as well as species and communities in order to understand and manage the underlying causes of decline.

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What’s the point?

How many $ to save biodiversity? How much money is needed to save biodiversity? Donal McCarthy and colleagues did a ‘back-of-the-envelope’ calculation for Science magazine of what it would cost to reduce the extinction risks of the world’s threatened animals (McCarthy et al., 2012). They used expert opinion combined with known costs on what it […]

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Biodiverse carbon plantings on Indigenous land

What’s possible, what’s optimal? The Carbon Farming Initiative (CFI) is a carbon offset scheme established by the Australian government. It provides opportunities for land owners and local communities to alter land management practices to reduce or sequester carbon emissions. In addition to storing carbon these practices also have the potential to deliver other environmental benefits such as the conservation of biodiversity […]

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Freshwater habitat and SEQ

Freshwater habitats occupy less than 1% of the Earth’s surface, yet they contribute disproportionately to global biodiversity. They support approximately 10% of all known species, and one third of all vertebrates. Unfortunately, they are also under the hammer with many freshwater habitats being degraded by a range of processes including exotic invasions, eutrophication, over extraction (of water) and flow regulation.

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Saving our Species launched in NSW

The Saving our Species program is a new NSW Government program that provides a coherent framework for the conservation of threatened species. It was launched in December 2013. The program engages the community to participate in threatened species recovery projects; aligns threatened species recovery effort across OEH and partners; and guides investment in targeted threatened species management actions.

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Biodiversity and fossil fuel extraction

There’s a global biodiversity crisis unravelling before our eyes and most of the major threats to biodiversity (such as habitat loss and invasive species) are being exacerbated by the growing impact of climate change. Science has convincingly demonstrated the connection between the burning of fossil fuels and climate change. Less well understood is the impact on our natural world of the actual extraction of these fossil fuels – coal, oil and gas.

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