Are people willing to pay for carbon farming?

Volunteers at the Organ Pipes National Park (just outside of Melbourne) help collect bats from bat boxes. The boxes, attached to the tree trunk, are around 6m off the ground. (Image by Claire Keely)

Are people willing to pay for carbon farming?

Public ‘willingness-to-pay’ for co-benefits Key messages: Adopting carbon farming practices often leads to a loss in profit for farmers We estimated the public’s ‘willingness-to-pay’ for the co-benefits of carbon farming Respondents were willing to pay $19.20 per year for every extra hectare of native vegetation, and $1.13 per year for every metric tonne of CO2-e […]

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Photo of riparian planting

Stream-side plantings and ecosystem services

What do dairy farmers think about planting riparian margins? Key messages: We surveyed Taranaki dairy farmers on their perceptions of the value of riparian plantings They reported many different values with the plantings; some positive, some negative Farmers who carried out riparian plantings reported improvement to both farm performance and the environment Over two stormy […]

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Riparian vegetation along Brisbane River. Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits.

Restoring waterways cost-effectively

Southeast Queensland’s waterways provide over $10 billion annually in economic benefits through drinking water supply, fishing, tourism, and recreation. But these goods and services are under threat from intensive agricultural, urban development and climate change.

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What happens to wildlife when farmland becomes a plantation?

What happens to the wildlife in patches of native vegetation when the surrounding agricultural landscape is converted from open grazed land to closed pine plantation forest? This is far from being an academic question as this situation is increasingly common as plantations are often established on cultivated or grazed land. Alessio Mortelliti and colleagues conducted […]

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